Information window - press J or ? to to open, ESC to close
Image Size
*
0 1 5 10 12
buttons on top of page represent photo heights of:
40px 133px 500px 1000px and 1200px
* There are 3 modes of display (
Z
) for a single photo:
1)normal, 2)background stretch, and 3)height or width stretch
Navigation - single photo
* Click mouse in left/right part of the screen
* Use +/- 5 10 20 50 buttons to skip forward/backward
* Use right/left keyboard arrow keys
* Use keyboard keys eg
N
=New Photos,
A
=Arizona
Settings window - ESC to close
Coming soon
14,055 photos 2017: 715 2016: 473 | 2015: 525
G
T
A
 
  • 1
  • 5
  • 7
  • 10
  • 12
    Navigator
    1.* Photos *
    |
    2.Best/Pano/Minis
    |
    3.My Adventures
    |
    4.Travels
    |
    5.Questions/Answers
    |
    6.Prog
    |
    7.Maps
    |
    8.Cool
    Questions/Answers
    1.1997-07-29-east-coast-canada.html
    |
    2.1997-08-22-temagami-1-1.html
    |
    3.1997-10-10-canoeing-temagami-white-caps.html
    |
    4.1998-07-slovakia.html
    |
    5.1998-12-greece-for-christmas.html
    |
    6.1999-04-11-states-in-8-days.html
    |
    7.1999-09-colorado-chicago-phoenix.html
    |
    8.2000-02-adventures-with-honda.html
    |
    9.2000-05-backpacking-with-rakesh.html
    |
    10.2000-06-04-humphreys-peak.html
    |
    11.2000-06-09-durango.html
    |
    12.2000-07-15-uphill-in-120-f.html
    |
    13.2000-12-snow-camping.html
    |
    14.2001-07-28-that-peak-over-there.html
    |
    15.2001-07-california-coast.html
    |
    16.2001-08-19-monsoon-in-grand-canyon.html
    |
    17.2001-09-23-praying-mantis.html
    |
    18.2002-07-vysoke-tatry-slovakia.html
    |
    19.2002-12-22-in-the-cold-again.html
    |
    20.2002-12-26-3-days-in-december.html
    |
    21.2003-02-15-snowbowl-snow-and-mud.html
    |
    22.2003-03-01-froze-toes-casa-grande.html
    |
    23.2003-03-10-mountain-cat.html
    |
    24.2003-03-16-15-mile-rain.html
    |
    25.2003-03-23-up-and-down-saguaro-twins.html
    |
    26.2003-03-29-casa-grande-60-miles.html
    |
    27.2003-04-12-tour-de-phoenix-65-miles.html
    |
    28.2003-07-20-lizards.html
    |
    29.2003-11-08-phoenix-denver.html
    |
    30.2003-12-20-looking-for-snow.html
    |
    31.2004-03-27-trust-your-instinct.html
    |
    32.2004-04-17-60-mph-wind.html
    |
    33.2004-05-10-desert-dreams.html
    |
    34.2004-05-30-ola-aneta-pictures-wind-and-fire.html
    |
    35.2004-06-12-a-day-at-mt-evans.html
    |
    36.2004-06-13-in-search-of-mountain-goats.html
    |
    37.2004-06-19-finally-independence-pass.html
    |
    38.2004-06-20-mighty-mt-evans.html
    |
    39.2004-06-27-week-in-arizona-utah.html
    |
    40.2004-07-11-beyond-estes-park.html
    |
    41.2004-07-23-awesome-yellowstone.html
    |
    42.2004-10-01-crested-butte.html
    |
    43.2004-11-25-super-snow-in-crested-butte.html
    |
    44.2005-03-18-tetons-in-winter.html
    (Navigator)
    1.* Photos * | 2.Best/Pano/Minis | 3.My Adventures | 4.Travels | 5.Questions/Answers | 6.Prog | 7.Maps | 8.Cool

    Humphrey's Peak (AZ)

    - [first draft: 2002-12-25] - [modified: 2003-01-10]
    2000/06/04
    -  +
    .First Posted: December 15, 2002.

     
    It was going to be just a little day hike. We didn't get to the bottom of the mountain until 3pm. It was a warm sunny day at 9,000ft. We were at the bottom of Snowbowl ski hill, with Humphrey's peak rising in the background. At 12,633ft, it is Arizona's highest peak. One reason for being so late was stopping in Flagstaff, and buying that tent which John was now carrying in his backpack. It was only 5lb, and we weren't going for a long time.

    Bottom of Snowbowl Boulder slope The trail first crossed a meadow, the ski slope in winter. Then we entered the woods. Within half hour we saw a clearing off the trail. It first looked like another ski slope, but turned out to be a slope of boulders. Big and small, the boulders layed there everywhere, as far as the eye could see.






    End of woods Humphrey's Saddle We hiked and hiked, and nobody felt like turning back. It was a warm sunny day, sun was still up, so we just kept going. We got to the saddle of the mountain, at 11,800ft. By the time we ate and were ready to move again, it was 8pm. Maybe high from the altitude, or just curious, since we were so close to the peak, we decided to go on. We had flashlights and raincoats for warmth...... why not.


    Into the unknown.. Into the unknown.. We noticed soon that there was no marked trail anymore. We were climbing up big rocks, sometimes on all fours. On our right was cliff dropoff -- better stay clear of that at night. One slip and you fall 1,000ft. We got to a snow field. It was a field at least 40ft wide. It was dirty old snow, but snow in June in Arizona? Cool. Closer to the peak the trail looked more like a trail. But there seemed to be other joining trails coming from the left.

    At 9pm we were at the peak. It was pitch dark and the wind was howling. We found shelter in a man-made circular area with 4feet high walls. We took out the raincoats, or rather one raincoat and one 8ft by 3ft ground sheet.

    We stayed for 15 minutes, then headed down. We put headlights on, and followed a trail. We didn't pay much attention to our surroundings, we just followed that trail. At then, the trail disappeared. Maybe it stopped being a trail at some point, maybe we didn't see another trail… but we were nowhere close to the way we came. We started feeling the altitude and the lightheadedness that comes with it. We left Phoenix at altitude 1300ft in the morning, and we spent already about 6 hours at altitudes over 9,000 ft, including almost 2 hours at 11,000ft. We knew about where the trail we should be on was, about 1,000ft above us. We started going backwards on the trail, but it seemed to disappear too. And it was too big of a detour too. We decided to go straight up. I went first. The terrain soon became a sea of small flat rocks, and with every step there was danger of sliding down. As I was walking on all fours, rocks 5 ft above me were moving. The wind was blowing, but we weren't real cold, the "raincoats" did the trick. Then John's lamp died. I had the extra batteries (or maybe I took them out of my camera), so I walked down to John. He wasn't enjoying the situation as much as I was, and suggested just walking straight down off the mountain. That would have helped with the wind and altitude, but we would still have 2hours+ of forest to go through, and finding the trail in the forest would be "challenging". Walking down a mountain is harder than walking up, if you're off the trail. It made more sense to walk uphill and return the way we came.

    And that's what we did. With some slipping and sliding, sweating and struggling, we got closer to the top of the mountain and walked in the direction we thought we should go. It looked like we were going the right way -- the trail looked like "walkable terrain". We couldn't tell for sure if that was the way we came up. I was really feeling the light-headedness. While walking down one rock with a 3 ft drop, I lost balance and landed on my back. I was testing a new backpack with a frame, and I was thankful for that. Especially for the frame of the backpack, it cushioned my fall. I lost balance a few more times, but I didn't fall anymore before the saddle. It must have been past midnight when we got to the saddle, but from there it was going to be easy. At 1:30am we were deep in the woods, following the trail -- easy. We saw someone walking up the hill. Wow, at this time of day? Since we first arrived at the saddle at 8pm we didn't see any people. We met some others walking down earlier during the day -- but then again, they were not pros like us. The lone hiker was an Indian on a mission. "The mountain is angry" he said. He spent the previous night camping somewhere in the vicinity. His sleeping bag was tied to the outside of his backpack. It was a big, bulky purple colored sleeping bag, the "old-school" style. It would do in 60F summer nights, but it wasn't suitable for mountain camping. We offered him some batteries because he was low on them. During over conversation he even turned off his flashlight to conserve power. Initially we were a little freaked out to see someone at this hour. I don't mind getting lost and even spending the night curled up in a ball and shaking (ok maybe i do mind that...... i just never had to), but meeting a person walking in wilderness at night can be "concerning".

    It looked like a long way down. The trail just kept going and going, and there was no sign of the end of the woods. We got to the car at 3am. I was in no shape to drive, I wanted to get down to 4,000ft Sedona area and sleep in a tent. So what if tomorrow is Monday, work can wait. John was gung-ho to get home, so he took the wheel. I kept my eyes closed during the way, but didn’t totally sleep. With the help of cold mocha coffee, John got us home at 7am. He was wasted however, and took the day off work. I drove home, slept til 10am then went to work. It seemed enough rest for the time being. We had 3 more days to recover until our next adventure -- 2000-06-09_Durango, but that's a totally different story...
    #Pursue Passion#
    .First Posted: December 15, 2002.

     
    Notes:
    Afterthoughts: 2003/02/16 - until now i had Humprey's Peak marked at 11,500ft. After talking to a local and wondering what he's smoking telling me that Humprey's is at 12,600ft, I looked it up, and yuppppppp -- Humphrey's Peak is at 12,633ft. His "I live here man" sounded convincing.

    Links:
    Rick's Humphrey's Peak - text and pictures (we never saw the peak's altitude sign)
    MuellerWorld - Humphrey's Peak and MANY other peaks in US... Great pictures; like Mnt Rainier - so cool! (ice axes and crampons)
    Advertise on this page.

    .my_adventures.2000-06-04-humphreys-peak

    54.225.16.10